Home OPINION NO TO NTF-ELCAC ABOLITION

NO TO NTF-ELCAC ABOLITION

United Nations Special Rapporteur Irene Kahn’s recommendation to abolish the
National Task Force to End Local Communists’ Arm Conflict elicited mixed reactions
from different sectors.

Among the senators, Senator Koko Pimentel supports its abolition, citing the task
force’s challenges in liquidating funds with COA, while Senator Chiz Escudero
disagrees, asserting that it addresses the root causes of insurgency.

In today’s world, where news travels fast and everyone is connected globally, the
dynamics of international relations often bring foreign policymakers, analysts, and
observers into the intricate web of domestic affairs of sovereign nations.

In light of its diverse socio-political landscape and amid critical issues like human rights
and the West Philippine Sea, the Philippines has garnered attention from international
observers. This prompts a thought-provoking question: Can these external perspectives
genuinely grasp the heartbeat of the nation more comprehensively than its own people?

While UN Rapporteur Khan, foreign analysts and policymakers undoubtedly bring
unique perspectives, academic expertise, and external lenses to their examination of
the Philippines, the crucial question remains: does this knowledge surpass the nuanced,
lived experiences of the Filipino people themselves?

It is important to understand that foreign views have limitations. The intricacies of
Philippine culture, history, and socio-political situations are deeply rooted in the daily
lives of its people. Even though international observers are skilled in theories and
geopolitical analyses, they might not fully understand the subtle details, emotions, and
cultural nuances that shape local stories.

In the Philippines, we all have different opinions coming from various regions and
communities, adding to our national discussions. To really understand the complexity of
our country, one needs to know our local details, languages, and historical background.
This can be tough for outsiders who might simplify or misunderstand things, or who
have not even spent a day in the Philippines,

I acknowledge the fact that foreign experts provide an unbiased view and offer a way to
compare situations, helping locals who might be too emotionally attached to the country
see in seeing things differently. Nevertheless, this objectivity can also imply that foreign
observers and analysts might not fully understand the daily experiences of Filipino
people.

I am personally not in favor of abolishing the NTF-ELCAC because the organization
plays a crucial role in addressing insurgency and fostering development in our country.
Abolishing it might disrupt ongoing initiatives and hinder the positive impact it has on the
affected areas and the country as a whole.

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